Interview by: Mac M.
Video, Music & Photos courtesy of Jingle Punks Music

Brady Clark is the Director of Catalog + A&R at Jingle Punks Music in New York. Brady grew up listening to classic rock, punk, and country. He took that love to college, majoring in Music Industry at Syracuse University. In 2008 he headed down to NYC to pursue a life in music. Having been in countless bands since elementary school, Brady now leads his own group in Brooklyn, The Brady Oh Show.

SYNCIN IN is a new conversation style feature with music licensing experts. We are teaming up with both music supervisors and licensing agents to find out tips and advice for music artists and also to find out more about each expert we interview.

Our first conversation is with Brady Clark, the Director of Catalog + A&R at Jingle Punks Music in New York. On topic we cover his balance between being a musician and music licensing agent, understanding music publishing, current trends in licensing + more!

GBS:
How did you get into the music licensing field?

Clark:
Music has always been a big part of my life. From playing in school bands and my own rock bands growing up, to going to college for music and writing and releasing my own material – I always thought that I would work in the industry in some capacity. When I first moved to NYC I was playing in bands and working in restaurants – I had a few college friends who had just started in the Licensing world and suggested I apply in that field. I started freelancing for Jingle Punks and was soon hired full time.

GBS:
When did you start working with Jingle Punks?

Clark:
I started at Jingle Punks in the spring of 2012 – working as tagger, entering and organizing metadata in our Library.

GBS:
As both a music artist and music licensing professional you see both sides of the fence daily. What are some of the most important lessons have you learned from balancing both careers?

Clark:
As an artist, quantity is key – you have to be proficient in writing. The more music an artist has monetized and ready to be licensed, the more likely a great placement is landed. As an A&R guy, the market is very subjective, there will be a lot of denial. If the artist is truly passionate about their music, then they should stick to it and keep pushing.

GBS:
Any tips, tricks or advice you can give a music artist trying to get their very first placement?

Clark:
Beggars can’t be choosers. Not to say that artists shouldn’t care about their music, but they should be willing to take any placement or license that comes in. Once an artists music begins placing in TV, it will start picking up momentum and landing bigger and bigger spots.

GBS:
Understanding the terminology, percentage rates and overall details of licensing deals can be difficult for first time artists or even seasoned artists. Could you define a few of the most misunderstood terms and walk us through a typical offer for an artist and his/her first licensing deal?

Clark:
Artists must be very familiar with music publishing, how royalties are distributed within their affiliated PROs, and understand that the majority of the money made in the licensing world comes from that revenue stream.

GBS:
Any trends right now that music supervisors are looking for in placements?

Clark:
Genre is sometimes subjective, as any genre can place these days. However mood and feel are extremely important. Upbeat, inspirational tracks with a great build will always do well.

GBS:
What is your favorite placement to date and why?

Clark:
My favorite placements that JP brought in were the Masha “Werewolves of London” campaign we did for Three Olives Vodka and the Lil’ Dicky “Save Dat Money” campaign for Old Navy featuring Elizabeth Banks.

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